Israel’s Animal Rights •

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We are paying a visit to Israel today to take a look at their current animal rights situation.
In 2017, Israel hosted the biggest animal rights march the world has ever seen. It was organised and sponsored by various animal rights organisations including Vegan Friendly – an Israeli based non-profit animal rights group whose logo is often seen on vegan food products in Israel to indicate that the product is vegan-friendly (in the UK we have the Vegan Society and their Vegan Trademark).

The event was 20,000 strong and vegans from all over the world came to Tel Aviv to take part in the march including guest speaker James Aspey, and PETA founder Ingrid Newkirk.
Israel has one of the biggest vegan populations in the world with an estimated five percent of the population (about 400,000) following a plant-based diet and/or advocating veganism. The Israeli Tourism Ministry has started to promote Israel as a Vegan Nation and tour operators have started vegan culinary tours of Tel Aviv.

Even the politicians of Israel are doing their bit to support the welfare of animals as a bill was passed last Sunday that will hopefully encourage livestock importers to reduce the amount of live sheep and calf’s that they bring in from Europe and Australia by 25%, then in three years from the bill being past, cut these imports entirely.

The bill has been supported by 27 cross party lawmakers as well as the Israeli the Prime Minister. The bill is based on the moral issues surrounding live animal transportation following an expose by the charity Animals Australia, where the true conditions of live animal shipment was revealed. This was then followed by a petition calling for live export to be stopped entirely with a total of 228 lawyers signing it.

However, not everyone is backing the bill. Agriculture Minister Uri Ariel believes that the bill will only lead to an increase in the price of meat products in a country where the demand for meat has risen by 25% in the past two years.

This may well be true, but if it reduces the amount of people who eat meat due to the rise in cost of such products, then isn’t that the point?

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